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to grow the economy, shrink government and create confidence that we are not greece. and, oh, heck, my friend steve kroft lobbed a bunch of softballs at president obama and hillary clinton in his "60 minutes" interview last night. and you know what, folks, we still do not know what happened on that tragic, awful night in benghazi when four people were killed. the administration spun two separate stories, we still don't know the narrative. all that, the "kudlow report" starts right now. >>> first up tonight, it could prove to be the most significant immigration reform in years. bipartisan group of four democratic and four republican senators unveiling their blueprint this afternoon for border security, guest worker cards, more foreign brainiacs and employer verification, maybe even a path to citizenship. cnbc's own eamon javers joins us now with the details. good evening, eamon. >> well, we've almost gotten out of practice at watching bipartisan groups of senators hold press conferences here in washington. that's not something we're used to seeing. in recent months, anyway. but the sena
under his watch improved things or left taxpayers more vulnerable than ever. the economy is not in free-fall, nor are the markets frozen, as many describe the financial crisis timothy geithner faced when he became treasury secretary as president obama was sworn into office the first time. finance professor dale rosenthal says government- directed taxpayer bailouts helped stabilize the economy. "instead of a big drop, we saw a softer landing but a longer recovery." under secretary geithner, the treasury department participated in bank bailouts despite risky gambles that led to the subprime mortgage collapse. critics say that under giethner, there was no assurance that banks would use their money to lend to business and homeowners. "there was no reportability, no accountability, it was just, 'give me the money and i'll save us.'" "the one part of the stimulus that worked was the money to state and local governments that went to teachers, firefighters, city workers. if that hadn't happened, unemployment would've been significantly worse." there were more bailouts. geithner oversaw $182 bil
with the u.s. energy revolution, aring if to help us this year on the economy. let's bring in our ace investors, david goldman, former head of income grout at bank of america and michael farr, author of "restoring our american dream, the best investment. abigail doolittle, the investors killed it after hours. >> i think what's going on is an important inflexion point. we had another earnings miss, another guide down. this once superstar amongst the text stock has been falling for a few months. i think traders answered vestors were waiting for this report to see what the future with look like. unfortunately it's not as bright as some might have hoped for and that's now showing up in the stock. >> is there an offset here? google did very well today and revenue was very good. apple versus google consideration apple stop this rally? i don't think so but i want to get your take on this. what does it mean apple is doing badly? is it an apple thing, an economy thing or consumer thing or what? >> i think that's a great question. i think right now i tend to agree with you. i think investors wi
on the dow today was the drop in jobless claims. while that is good news, markets and the economy have another big headache. it's called washington. with me now, harvard economist jeffrey myron. good to see you. as always, let's start with these weekly jobless claims. it's getting some attention, some bus. they were down 5,000 to 330,000. that is the lowest level in, i believe, two years. pretty impressive. is this a trend? >> at think it probably is. i think we will see gradual and continual improvement in the jobless numbers. it will gradually see some improvement in the unemployment rate. and don't think it's going to be really fast. of the car going to see overall growth in gdp really speed up. everything seems to suggest we will muddle along. we have had for the last three years of so. better than recession, but not nearly as fast as we have normally expected. gerri: well, as part of it due to washington because they cannot seem to solve any of the problems in front of them, whether it is sequestration on the debt ceiling? >> i certainly think that washington policies play a big r
. we are going to take the greatest economy in the greatest country, with the greatest responsibility in the world and we are going to put them on a 0-day leash. . how does a great country respond on a 90-day leash? we know what happened the world saw this happened. we got downgraded in the credit rating. that drove up the cost of borrowing in the united states. that drove up the borrowing cost of corporations. that drove up the costs of counties and cities that we represent. and we're told again that should we falter on the credit debt of the united states, that we can expect a downgrade and we can expect a further downgrade in cities and counties all over the country. and somehow we're supposed to believe this is a good plan. what this plan does -- can i have three additional minutes? mr. mcgovern: i yield the gentleman two additional minutes. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized for two minutes. mr. miller: what this plan does is hold the jobs of american families and working people all across this had country, it holds them hostage. it holds them hostage to the pa
have a spirit of innovation here in washington that haswe are not done. [applause] a new world economy is emerging from the depths of this recession, and while its contours and relationships are not fully understood to us, we do know two things, one. with our uniquely powerful fusion of values and talents, washington state has the potential to lead the next wave of world-changing innovations. two. the world will not wait for us. global competition for the jobs of tomorrow. leading this next wave of growth entitlement. we must move, swiftly and boldly, to put this recession behind us, and bring forward a unique economic strategy that much." today, i'd like to share my vision of the path ahead. i know that to achieve this vision we must all work together. democrat and republican, house and senate, east and west, to answer the challenges of our age. i have represented both sides of our state, first as a state representative from yakima valley, then in congress representing both eastern and western washington. i want to thank the people of washington for electing me your governor. [applaus
and taxes even more, whether it is cap and trade, regulating our economy and raising the costs for every american, they are feeling emboldened right now. and if conservatives stand together, we can stop that, and stopping bad things that would harm this country, that would harm americans, is a major victory for the next two years. [applause] but the third thing we can do in the short term is we can use leverage points to plaque real progress on the fiscal and economic crisis threatening this country. the fundamental dynamic when you have divided government is that whichever side owns the default is in the stronger position. either party can stop anything. so whoever wins if nothing gets done, wins the negotiation, wins the battle. it's why on fiscal cliff we got such a lousy deal. because if nothing happened, the result was a massive tax increase on er american who pays taxes, and i think president obama was perfectly fine, he was serene to go off that cliff. why? because his substantive agenda, which he doesn't hide from, is to dramatically expand the size and power of government, and t
that health care is now a huge part of our economy. accounting for almost 30% of gdp. that is to point trillion dollars. -- that is two trillion dollars. i am sure the policy students play a drinking game while watching programs like this on c-span based on how many times the word "unsustainable" is repeated. those same 2011 spending figures released earlier this month revealed that for the third year in a row aggregate spending grew by just 3.9%, the smallest increment in decades. to paraphrase ross perot's running mate in a debate many years ago, "why are we here?" at least one response to that question is we do not know if the health-care cost dragon has been slain or is just hibernating. how much of the slow increase comes from the sluggish economic recovery where people without insurance postpone care over which they don't have any kind of discretion at all, and what about the chronic conditions that continued the development of more sophisticated and expensive treatments and tasks? and for the most expensive health care program there is the fact that 10,000 baby boomers are joini
to note with after almost four years having passed with an economy that's been struggling, the senate never acted. it took one week in which their paychecks were on the line that now the senate is going to step up and do the right thing. we welcome them to this debate around the budget of the nation and look forward to making sure we can begin to reduce the mountain of debt that is facing our children. >> when you go across the country and talk to individuals, they're always stunned. it has been four years since the senate did a budget. when they stood back and looked the last time they did a budget, the ipad wasn't introduced or chevy volt and no instagram. it's shocking. today, you found a bipartisan vote that is asking for accountability and effectiveness in government and that's why we are moving it and we welcome the opportunity that the senate joins the debate and actually brings accountability back. >> today, the house acted. the house acted to put washington on a budget and to force a conversation about how we spend money. everyone in america understands that budgets matter. a
'll tell what you, if the economy keeps getting better over the next three years, you've got hillary linton rclin running three years from now, we republicans have such a major headwind in our face for the next three years. it's going to be tough. >> yeah, there's no question. but there's so many variables. >> go ahead. >> no, so many variables that could happen in the next 3 1/2 years. >> yeah. ed sees you making a motion, he stops. >> i was trying to get richard haass in on this. >> she wants some more 'roids. >> andrea, i'm sorry, we cut you off. >> no, there are other points about the politics of it. joe biden is going to be at the white house, in closed meetings with the president today and has had a very high-profile role. clearly, this is the interview that he would have wanted to see. and when you talk to a lot of leading democrats who were in town this weekend, they were saying that joe biden has everything going for him except that hillary clinton is a woman and is a celebrity and has the best popularity. and she has the virtue, after eight years then of barack obama and the obama
about the economy, 8.3 fewer americans are working today than there were four years ago, what is your reaction to that? >> well, just shows you how out of touch eghe is. normally when the president is reelected, remember, no landslide. you work together, find common ground and work ford. this person's goal is to break the republican party. he's out of touch where america is at and it's more of a speech after progressive party agenda not something for all of america to get behind. >> sean: how ironic, too, the president lecturing the americans on tone and did you remember of talking about mitt romney and a steel worker's wife? >> and when you work on a president's speech in the inaugural, you usually have a take away line. what is the take away line. normally when the election is over, it's time to govern, he moved the campaign committee going when he can't run for further office. this is what this individual does. he can't govern, but that's what he continues to do is just politics. >> sean: all right, you're a leader of the republican party in the house, one area of government where
to not be part of that, because it is terrible for the economy and seems to be bad politics. host: white house press secretary jay carney. let's hear purcellville in broken arrow, oklahoma, republican. what is your advice to republicans for the second obama administration? caller: i love c-span and i am so glad that you have this live call-in talk show from individuals all over the world. my question is, to the republicans, i know that you heard in the inaugural speech to the word "to gather." we have to come together. together we stand as we the people. i know and hope that our president of the united states, president obama, is hearing our voices this morning being back in the white house for and other four years. i am a military mom. i want to say this to the republicans. please work with our president of the united states. he is the general in chief for all of us. is gettingely on who more. we can ask. we can write letters. we can twitter and all the settings. but we have to come together. he is the one we voted for. as we let's work together the people. that is my answer to the republican
from our economy, particularly for hispanics and african-americans. >> dana, the stock market is at a five-time high -- a five-year high. unemployment is at a five-year low. he says on the one hand he wants to reach out. you can see the shares in the dow jones right now. what is this man talking about? please, translate it because i'm not intelligent enough to understand it. >> there is apparently a bit of a mixed message occurring at the rnc winter meeting. >> in the very brain of the chairman. >> i think bobby jindal had a point where he said we need to stop being the party of austerity. we need to stop saying how good we can be at shrinking and cutting government. that is not a winning message. he's absolutely right about that. and then you have the party here in washington doing exactly what he said not to do, and you have paul ryan coming forward and saying, yes, i'm going to -- we lost the election so i'm actually going to double down on this. i'm going to cut 40% of the federal government out over the next ten years because that's exactly what the people want to hear an
in the red for 2012. the world's third biggest economy has posted a trade deficit of $78.3 billion. u.s. house ever presented this has passed a bill to extend the debt limit until may. it effectively put off the possibility of the u.s. defaulted on its debt. three weeks earlier, congress and the white house hammered out the last-minute deal to prevent the so-called fiscal cliff. the u.s. debt stands at $16.50 trillion. the british prime minister has been building on wednesday's historic speech about his country's future with the european union. david carolwood speaking at the world economic forum -- david cameron was speaking at the world economic forum in switzerland. >> britain has a choice purdue and hope it stands back and the argument -- britain has a choice. they can stand back or say yes, the european union needs to change to suit the euro but also to suit all of us as well. make the argument for a flexible, competitive euro, take the british people with you. >> south africa is looking at newark power for its future nuclear ended -- at nuclear power for its future and nuclear e
21 allows to continue to improve the way we make, the way we move freight that fuels our economy. map 21 streamlines and consolidates programs. map 21 helps short project delivery a priority for president obama and congress. when we deliver projects faster we deliver their benefits faster. like enhancing safety, less congestion, and a cleaner environment. the project delivery improvement included in map 21 are based on an innovate shun initiative known as every day counts. they took it from you, victor. you've done a great job with everyday counts. let's hear it for victor menendez what he has done and his team has done. thank you, victor. [applause] the concept behind everyday counts is the same as this year's trb conference. better, faster, and smarter. finally map 21 helps us keep our transportation system safe. this law gives the department for the first time oversight over transit safety. again, beg thanks goes to peter rogoff of a the train crash here in washington, peter and i sided we would commit ourselves to getting the department of transportation into the transit safety bu
great economies throughout the world trying to continue colonialism or imperialism or whatever you want to call it. zogby to pull back, take care of the u.s. -- we need to pull back. we are shortchanging the u.s. host: this is more from yesterday, secretary clinton giving her assessment. [video clip] >> we live in a dangerous and incredibly complicated world now with very different forces at work. state-based and non-state. technology and communication. i am older than the president. i don't want to surprise anybody by saying that. >> not by much. >> i remember some of the speeches of eisenhower as a young girl. you have got to be careful. you have to be thoughtful. you cannot rush in especially now where it's more complex than it has been in decades. so, yes, there are wicked problems like syria, absolutely. we are on the side of american values, freedom, the aspirations of all people to have a better life, to have the opportunity we are fortunate to have here. but it's not always easy proceed exactly what must be done in order to get to that outcome. so i certainly am grateful for the
month. visit choosenissan.com. road and track called sentra an economy car minus the look and feel of an economy car. wonder how civic and corolla look and feel about that. the all-new nissan sentra, with best-in-class mpg. lease for $169 per month. visit choosenissan.com. >>> initial estimates say the crowd at yesterday's inaugural was at least 1 million people. that's down from the 1.8 million who came out to see president obama sworn in the first time, but even so, a turnout of a million people put's obama's second inaugural at one of the biggest ever. look at that crowd. it's almost double who turned out to see george w.'s second inaugural and tops the 800,000 who saw bill clinton sworn in. before obama the previous crowd estimate record was 1.2 million who came out for lbj, lyndon johnson's inaugural back in '65. we'll be right back. in america today we're running out of a vital resource we need to compete on the global stage. what we need are people prepared for the careers of our new economy. by 2025 we could have 20 million jobs without enough college graduates to fill them
class voters, at a time when the economy is going through a very complicated, difficult moment when it's not clear how to get back to growth, he's thinking creatively about how to use the strength of his state to build on its weaknesseses. and i think at the national level that's what conservatives have to do. to some extempt, it's being done. i would say the policy agenda that has to come at the end of that conversation is not fully worked out by any means, but the questions are being asked. i think the direction of thinking has been helpful even in the wake of the election. if you listen to what people like marco rubio or paul ryan have been saying, it's different from what they themselves were saying six months ago, a year ago. i think the focus is turning to the right place. that doesn't mean that he'll persuade the public, but it certainly helps to ask the right question if you're looking for the right answer. >> where joe, i want to bring up something that my friend john podhoretz mentioned, and i say that carefully because reihan salam, my name has up been butchered by others, s
% of the entire budget of government at a time that the world is getting smaller, that our economy depends on its relationship with every other country in the world, that we face a more global market than any time in our history, so not just in my briefings a s at the state department, but in my conversations with business leaders, in my trips to crisis areas, to war zones, to refugee camps, and in some of the poorest countries on earth, i have been reminded of the importance of the work our state department does to protect and advance america's interests and do the job of diplomacy in a dangerous world and particularly, i think, there is more that can be done to advance our economic capacity and interests. in this debate and in every endeavor, i pledge to work very closely with this committee, mr. chairman, mr. ranking member, not just because it would be my responsibility but because i will not be able to do this job effectively, nor will our country get what it needs to out of these initiatives without your involvement and your ideas going forward. so thank you, mr. chairman and members of the
descending on the tiny ski town off davos, switzerland for the world economic forum. the economy will be front and center as the group's founder has warned the world has not yet escaped the risk of economic collapse? do we ever. we have davos covered all week long. you will not want to miss a minute with liz claman. she sits down with richard gelfond, imac ceo. that is right here on fox business. she has a slew of guests. all the all-stars. lori: want to take a trip to a warmer climate? southwest airlines announcing well, it might cost you a little more especially if you want to board early. a $40 fee guaranties passengers get to be one of the first 15 people in line to board. travelers who want to be first on the plane can purchase the option at the gate up to 45 minutes before boarding. but space is limited. only 15 of these early passes will be sold. southwest, the nation's most popular domestic airline already charges $10 for early bird check-in service but early bird service improves your spot in the boarding queue. doesn't guaranty a specific spot like the fee will and grab
and the overall shape and direction of the economy. could you speak to that? >> i for started talking about it two years ago. -- i first started talking about it two years ago. i started talking about what was possible with oil. i was a lone wolf in the woods at the time. since then, the bandwagon has loaded up. a lot of other people are saying, yes, it could happen, and it to be very important for america. particularly as it translates from energy to the general economy. there are more pillars' out there, housing, manufacturing -- they depend on recovery. the one that does not is energy, because the international demand is already there. it has been created by china, india. all around the world. the weakened cash in on that. would not have to wait on it. -- we can cash in on that. we do not have to wait on it. we need to keep doing what we're doing. it is going to mean a tremendous amount of jobs. we have seen that all through the midwest. north dakota is certainly a huge example of it. they say now there is to% and unemployed -- 2% unemployed there. we cannot find those folks. [laughter] we're s
, of the global economy and also for us in europe, um, is free trade. we have, unfortunately, a lot of protectionist tendencies in the world today. when we met at the g20 meeting outlined this time and again and impressed this on us, and we need to do everything we can in order to contain these protectionist tendencies. the doha round, the world trade organization has not, unfortunately, developed in such a positive direction as we wished. so in the future, too, unfortunately, we need to pin our hopes on financial trade agreements. and germany, i can promise you, will be very proactive as regards the conclusion of such fha agreements. we've now given the mandate for a free trade agreement with japan, with canada. we're shortly before conclusion of an fta with the -- [inaudible] states. we urgently need to come to such agreements. and after decades of failed attempts, we would like to do this with the united states as well, develop such a free trade agreement with the european union. quite often cultural exports are a bit bit of a hurdle here on bh sides, but i think we need to do, w
as we think about the economy of the united states coming and as you point out, the other developing countries around the world. one of the efforts of this administration has been to promote business advocacy abroad for domestic businesses at home. i led a trade mission to india about a year and a half ago with a number of businesses from new and church, and they talked about how important it was to have that support from the state officials in india as they were looking to try to establish those business relationships. can you talk about how you might continue that and continue that this is something you would be focused on an unwilling to continue to support? >> well, as i said in my opening, i think foreign policy is increasingly economic policy, and we have an undersecretary for economic affairs, economics, energy etc.. i think that the state department historical use to have a foreign commercial service back in 1979. it slipped away. i think the secretary had the time -- i think that is something we ought to be doing in a very significant way. obviously working with the treasury
economies in the east and the south. now, of course, a growing world economy benefits us all, but we should be in no doubt that a new global race of nations is underway today. a race for the wealth and for the jobs of the future. the map of global influence is changing before our eyes. and these changes are already being felt by the entrepreneur in the netherlands, the worker in germany, the family in britain. so i want to speak to you today with urgency and frankness about the european union and how it does change, both to deliver prosperity and to retain the support of its peoples. but first, i want to set out the spirit in which i approach these issues. i know that the united kingdom is sometimes seen as an argumentative and rather strong-minded member of the family of european nations. and it is true that our geography has shaped our psychology. we have the character of an island nation. we are independent, forthright, passionate in defense of our sovereignty. we can no more change this british sensibility than we can train the english channel. and because of this sensibility, we come t
was just circumstances, the economy wasn't bad enough to fire obama and the republican party, its brand was still being dragged down with the association through the financial crisis in iraq and sundry other leftovers of the bush years? >> i think the clearest way to look at this is to look at 2010. 2010 was a resounding rejection of what obama had done in the first two years. it was a resounding rejection of the inintrusiveness expansion of the government. it essentially was a referendum on this kind of hyper liberalism and a referendum on the question of the size, the scope, the reach of government, and it was kind of a pure ideological election, because there were no personalities involved. you weren't voting for a president, you weren't voting up and down on a figure, you were voting on issues. and the don't instant -- dominant issue was obama, was the increase in spending, was essentially the expansion of government. or to put it a more abstract and grand way, the relationship between citizen and state which obviously was tilting towards state. so -- and there when the question is
reduction, methods for the economy, and we've got a pretty stacked agenda and urgency in the country to address it. >> what i don't think is constructive what the president is doing, within minutes of that horrible tragedy in newtown, the president began trying to exploit that tragedy to push a gun control agenda that's designed to appeal to partisans, designed to appeal to his political partisans. >> you rather freshman republican ted cruz suggesting that the president has been trying to take advantage of the newtown tragedy and the white house aides previously denied that. what is interesting is that some of those divisive details about gun control, immigration reform, we're told by aides at the white house will not come up tomorrow and the president will try to do the broad bush and follow up with the details on some of the issues, state in the union address, that's next month back on capitol hill. >> ed, thank you very much. the landscape of the president obama's second term is pretty different than when he came into the white house four years ago, as you know, and ed was kind of
going to hurt the economy. how would this hurt the economy? >> i don't see how discouraging speculation, which is almost all done with borrowed money. they effectively borrow money at a rate of 30 to 1. you put 3% down and borrow the rest of the money. i don't see how this hurts the economy. and if we reduce this volatility and reduce market distortion, we can get back to having a market focused on investments that create production in the future and wealth in the future, not creaming the market today through speculation. >> quickly, you think this is something congress could embrace? >> not probably in this congress in the house, but i think this is an idea. it's been around for 80 years. we may well see come about, ed, and hopefully we. we need speculators, but we don't want them to be overwhelming the market. >> all right, david cay johnston, thank you for your time on the "ed show." that is "the ed show." i'm ed schultz. thanks for joining us tonight. the rachel maddow show starts right now. good evening. >> geek, rachel. your e block in particular was stellar. i want you to meet te
% of the entire budget of the government. at a time when the world is getting smaller, our economy depends on its relationship with every other country in the world's comment we face a more global markets at any time in our history. not just in my briefings at the state department, but in my conversations with business leaders and in my trips to crisis areas, to war zones, refugee camps, and in some of the poorest countries on earth, i've been reminded of the importance of the work our state department does to protect and advance america's interests and do the job of diplomacy and a dangerous world. i think there is more that can be done to advance our economic capacity and interest. in this debate and in every endeavor, i pledge to work closely with this committee. not just because it will be my responsibility, but because i will not be able to do this job effectively without your involvement and your ideas going forward. thank you, mr. chairman and members of the committee. i know there is a lot of ground to cover. >> [inaudible] [indiscernible] >> when i first came to washington and testified,
, what did you learn? >> we need cuts, we need more revenue, but equally, we need growth in the economy. letting start-ups, tax reform, and regulatory reform help. that's what we need more. >> you really think we need more? >> i mean, you want to make fun of -- >> i don't ever make fun of playing. i like my politicians who play. and who have cameras around when they do. what did you learn today, sam? >> you picked your clothes by number. i have no idea. the sweater collection could probably use an upgrade. >> this is number 47 right here, by the way. >> this is the hollywood business sweater, right? >> that's right! >> i learned about super fierce sri lankan women fighter, and victor garber is wonderful, and my neighbor. which is great. >> if it's way too early, harold, what time is it? >> it's time for "morning joe". >> but coming up next -- >> is my man, chuck todd on "the daily rundown". >> no, luke. >> luke russert! >>> taking it to the streets, vice president biden heads into virginia to make the case for new gun law. can a campaign-style push pressure congress to get something don
. that was way before the economy went into freefall, so he had a couple other priorities he had to deal with when he first came into office. and the third thing, erin, is that this president wants this as his legacy. and he has said that he wants it to be a priority, even during the re-electiore-election, he tt this, so he knows that now he has a debt to pay. the republicans need to do this as a necessity, and with all due respect to the congressman, this is absolutely an issue of electoral survival for the republican party. the congressman is right that this isn't the only thing that republicans need to soften up their tone on, but if this isn't something they get done for the latino community, they're not going to listen to them on anything else. >> congressman, here is my problem intellec chatually from where you're coming from. and this is a complicated issue, but i don't understand. these people are already here. you're not going to be able to pick them up and move them out. that's not practical. so if you start from that point of view, how are you ever going to get a deal? >> if i
, pennsylvania. if people had basic understanding of economy being, if a country promotes economic equality over economic freedom, the economy will fail. and feared may be too late. terry nelson, florida, i don't believe romney's message was wrong, it was just twisted by the media. some truth in that, terry, but the governor had many opportunities to counter that on this program and others, he didn't show up. brad johnson, kansas, a huge slice of evangelical simply couldn't vote for mitt because of theology, they can't complain now. if you're waiting for st. peter to show up, he's otherwise occupied. and mayor john hickman, from nevada. great debate with stephanopoulos, no spin, no bull. and cindy withholding our laname in connecticut. you men can't tell women they can't have abortion. the state has been allowing abortions for pretty much any reason in the third trimester, cindy. if like governor cuomo, you support that, you better hope, better hope there's no judgment day. my job is to protect the kids and i will continue to do it. marsha, from new jersey, late term abortion is murder, period-
. . >>> here's another sign that the housing market is turning around and the economy is getting better. lowe's is hiring in a big way. the home improvement chain is looking to add 54,000 worker this is spring. most of the jobs are part-time and only last through september, but it's still a job. 9,000 workers will be permanent employees. that's good news. apple stock getting hammered. disappointed by the first quarter earnings and outlook for future growth. so allison, we were talking about it and everything was apple, apple. >> it was going so swimmingly. >> why is everyone suddenly -- i don't know, but a lot of people, why are a lot of people soured on apple? >> it's not a sudden transformation since september. you look at the report card and what it shows is that apple cannibalized itself. people out there wound up buying lower priced apple products instead of higher priced top of the line. they bought the iphone 4s instead of the 5 and the mini instead of the higher priced one. come on. apple recorded record profits and sold 48 million iphones and 23 million ipads and not to mention the 1
in the u.s.? at t. rowe price, we understand the connections of a complex, global economy. it's just one reason over 75% of our mutual funds beat their 10-year lipper average. twe price. invest with confidence. request a prospectus or summary prospectus with investment information, risks, fees and expenses to read and consider carefully before investing. ♪ lou: senator kerry well, in all likelihood, almost unimaginable that he would not be confirmed as secretary of state next week. the nominee, by the way, calling to implement the president's foreign policy vision well morning at the same time that u.s. influence depends on the ability to tackle our debt. >> more than ever for an policy is economic policy. i am especially cognizant of the fact that we cannot be strong in the world. lou: joining us now, fox news national security analysts, holding national security posts under three different presidents . former state department director of policy planning under president george w. bush and president of washington college. good to have you with this. let me start with you, if i may. i w
, i'm not sure that this is just some weakening of the military system. the economy is on the brink. now we may be going to this different type of military. i am not sure if there is an underlying purpose for this. i do not think -- they do great, there are great roles for women in the military, but i do not think this will work. host: thank you for the call. on our facebook page -- from our twitter page, there is this -- one more call on this topic, and then we will turn our attention to the senate yesterday -- dorothy from baltimore, good morning. caller: i am glad i am a woman on your expressing my views. women should not be in infantry. absolutely not. host: why? caller: we are not built for that. men and women action not be in close contact like that. it will not work. it simply will not work. it is in our nature. manpower -- men are attracted to women. that is a fact that cannot be in -- ignored. we're not physically build to do that. we can do things, i am not trying to down women. we are not meant. -=- -- men. host: the pentagon of lifting the ban on women to serve on the fr
are dismantling our economy to do absolutely nothing for the global climate. if you have china and india do what we are doing, intending to do, you would actually make a change that would make a difference. otherwise, what we're doing is dismantling our industry and essentially exporting it to china and india, where all of the carbon pollution is coming from. >> dealing with china and india is the job of the state department. hillary clinton. >> we were misled and there were protests and that the assault sprang out of that. >> with all due respect, we have four dead americans because of a protest or was it guys out for a walk that decided they would kill americans? what difference, at this point, does it make? it is our job to figure out what happened and figure out -- do everything we can to prevent it from happening again. >> the issue was the attack on our coulatin benghazi, took four lives, and with reference from we just heard, susan rice's comments on tv. one member of congress said clinton had allowed the consulate to become a death trap. what have we learned from these hearings? >> demag
are dismantling our economy to do absolutely nothing for the global climate. >> dealing with india and china is the job of the state department. hillary clinton in fighting form. >> we were led to believe that there were protests and the assault sprang out of that. >> with all due respect, we have four dead americans. was it because of a protest or guys out for what one might deciding to kill americans? at this point, what difference does it make? it is our job to figure out what happened and do everything we can remember prevented from happening again. >> the issue was the attack on our consulate in benghazi, it took the lives of four americans, and with reference to what we heard, susan rice pops controversial appearance after the attack. rand paul told secretary clinton that he would have fired her. others said that they allow the content to become a death trap. what have we learned? >> demagoguery is alive and well on capitol hill. what do they expect? that she would go up on the hill and say, the state department, the obama administration engaged in mendacity, this was a real cover up,
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